LG uses Hillcrest Labs’ patented Freespace in-air pointing and motion control technology their 3D TV

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Hillcrest Labs is proud to announce that LG, the South Korean consumer electronics giant, will be using their patented Freespace in-air pointing and motion control technology for their latest line of 3D-ready, Internet-connected HDTVs which have hit the Korean market, only to be unleashed upon the rest of the world later on. Known as the “Magic Wand” remote, it will see action in selected models within LG’s new INFINIA line of LED LCD HDTVs. Just to whet your appetite, the INFINIA sets will come in a slim design, a thin bezel, and an enhanced Internet connectivity package that will carry with it a variety of entertainment options, such as LG’s NetCast Entertainment Access. Not only that, the inclusion of a wired Ethernet jack in the INFINIA sets will allow these NetCast-enabled TVs to integrate themselves into a wireless home network seamlessly thanks to a USB wireless broadband adaptor (that is sold separately, unfortunately). If you love being first in everything, then the INFINIA models ought to be your purchase choice, since they are the first to use LG’s unique “Magic Wand” remote control system.

LG’s “Magic” user interface will merge Internet-based applications, television menus and embedded games amongst others using simple hand motions (should be a snap to those who have had experience with the Nintendo Wii, while newcomers will find it natural and intuitive) to control an on-screen cursor on the television. No longer will you need a computer, since the “Magic Wand” remote with Netcast will be able to access and navigate Internet-based applications specifically designed for the TV.

What makes the “Magic Wand” so special? Apart from its high resolution pointer accuracy that makes it a snap to easily select icons and images, small and large, on a high-resolution screen, you also benefit from orientation compensation – basically, it doesn’t matter the orientation of the Magic Wand remote in space, Freespace technology will still generate intuitive cursor motions on the screen. The use of MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) sensors combined with Hillcrest’s proprietary software will result in consistent control of the device from any position – standing, sitting or reclining.

Press Release

3 reviews or comments

joseph de alejandro Says: September 9, 2010 at 2:06 pm

is the computer screen technology (i.e., moving screen content with a wave of a finger, expansion of a line item with the finger, etc.) used on ncis los angeles real? I checked with some computer stores and they told me it was not real. Can you clarify?

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