The Touch, The Feel of … Insulation

by Mike D

insulation

Cotton is not only in the shirt that keeps you warm, but now it can be found in the walls of houses. In a new effort to create sustainable, “green” building materials, Green Depot is retailing ULTRATOUCH R30 insulation. It is a little more expensive than the pink fiberglass stuff ($126.00 for 64 sq feet), but its R-rating is equivalent (the number that is important to you when it comes to thermal insulation). The blue material is 85% post-industrial cotton denim fibers that carries no hazard warning, is highly sound-proof and doesn’t itch.

Recently, some Hollywood stars were on TV talking about how their remodeling projects were done with “green” materials. The media is full of stories about how to make our planet “green” again in the face of … well… our efforts to “un-green” it. If you think about it, companies like Levi-Strauss and Hanes must make thousands if not millions of shirts and pants a year. Where do all of the old ones go? Perhaps into your walls. Who knows whose denim you might be stuffing your wall with next (this insulation material is likely made of manufacturing waste, but it is still an interesting thought). The companies who make the more common pink stuff claim on their websites that they are using an environmentally-friendly manufacturing process – something I find hard to believe. Last I checked, I wasn’t buying boxers made of fiberglass.

4 reviews or comments

Neagle Says: May 1, 2007 at 11:11 am

Nifty! I don’t like foam or even that blown in stuff so to me this is worth the cost on a new install. Anyone seen a fire rating for this product?

Latest Gadget Gallery » Coolest Gadgets Says: May 1, 2007 at 12:41 pm

[…] « The Touch, The Feel of … Insulation […]

EEJ Says: May 1, 2007 at 12:48 pm

I think I know what you mean, but since when does “environmentally friendly” mean that you can make boxers (or other clothes) out of it?

Personman Says: May 1, 2007 at 2:42 pm

Cellulose is my fave– we went from 1200 sq. ft in our house, to ~2500, and we installed cellulose in the new addition (in contrast to the fiberglass in the old) and our AC bill the next month (later during the HOTTER part of summer) was only $3.50 higher than the last, with a total AC bill of around ~$80.

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