Awesome Kiting Water Sport

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Wego Kite TubeThis looks so much fun, a combination of paragliding, water-skying and kite flying; introducing the Wego Kite Tube.

The Wego Kite Tube is for all you water sport adrenaline junkies. Instead of doing the mundane banana boats or paragliding you can balance your self on the Kite Tube be dragged along the water and then pull up into the sky. The pictures of it in action look pretty awesome, and if I can find one for hire on my next holiday this will be how I get my ritual holiday injury (that is if my back is better after Go-Karting incident at the weekend, thanks Geoff)

You can get further info and buy the Wego Kite Tube from Sports Stuff and thanks Uber Review for finding it.

32 reviews or comments

DScrogs924 Says: May 23, 2006 at 8:54 am

Had the kite tube out yesterday. Got face planted at 5 foot at the 45′ length and thought I broke my jaw. Then increased the length to 65′ and a gust of wind brought me to about 20′. Then like a monster, it twisted and threw my off like a rag doll (and I weigh 230)into the water on my back at 18′ feet high. Needless to say, every muscle and bone in my back is sore. Can’t wait to go out again though!!!!

Solar Powered 8m Airship for only Ten pounds » Coolest Gadgets Says: May 31, 2006 at 10:55 am

[…] This solar powered gadget looks a load more fun than the solar powered ventilator we wrote about earlier (though not as much fun as the Wego Kite Tube). The black Solar Airship is probably the most fun you can have in the park with your clothes on. […]

Jerry Says: June 7, 2006 at 7:25 pm

New tube took out last Sunday. Experienced fit crew of 20+ year old guys. Careful driving… no alcohol involved, good life vest. About 25 MPH into a light wind. You can’t control it… no matter your experience. There is no reson for this to fly under any control. It’s just a large round saucer that traps air underneath until it tilts or falls out of the sky for whatever reason. One guy got whip lash. Had to be x-rayed on Monday because he couldn’t move his neck. Another guy got thrown off at about 15 feet in the air. Landed on the tube and got knocked out. Then bounced into the water. He layed unconscious face down until we could get the boat around to rescue him. Pulled him into the boat blue and unconscious. Luckily we got him to cough and regain consciousness. Paramedics, 911, the whole story. Spent the night in the hospital and 4 days later still working the salt water out of his lungs and on a nebulizer to try to repair the lung damage and breath normally again. We’re very active in all water sports, so really hoping there will not be any permanent lung damage.

It’s not a matter of if you will get hurt… just when.

Sean Says: July 3, 2006 at 12:38 pm

I have had the tube out a couple of times before and no injuries have occured, but yesterday it was real windy, one guy (190 LBS.)ruptured an eardrum going about 30 mph falling from only 10 ft. we took him to the dock so he could go to the hospital, then went back out the next guy (235 LBS.) fell from about 5 feet and was knocked out for only a sec, but he was done for the day, and the next guy (175 LBS.) fell from about 25 feet the tube just went up flipped on it side and threw him off like the last guy that posted this and his ear filled up with water, everyone else on the boat got scared and no one else wanted to ride it the rest of the day. I am going to sell this death trap. note the guy whose ear filled up I talked to him he still can’t hear out of it he thinks he needs to get it drained he is on his way to the hospital, this is the next day.

Chris Aquadro Says: July 5, 2006 at 11:41 am

Just wanted to say thanks to those who have posted comments. I was going to buy one of these for my daughter and am very grateful for the candid responses. I am sure they saved her or others from serious injury.

Brian Says: July 5, 2006 at 5:09 pm

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml06/06202.html

CPSC Warns Consumers about Dangers of Tube Kiting
Two Deaths over the Past 3 Months Attributed to New Water Sport

WASHINGTON, D.C. � In advance of the July 4th holiday weekend, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is warning consumers about the possible dangers associated with a new type of water recreation known as �tube kiting.�

CPSC is concerned about death and injury reports associated with tube kiting. It is currently investigating two versions of these products to determine if there is a significant product hazard.

Tube kiting is a relatively new form of extreme water sport which is fast growing in popularity, but also extremely dangerous. CPSC is aware of at least two deaths associated with tube kiting this year. A 33-year-old Texas man was killed in late April 2006 while tube kiting, and a 42-year-old man died from injuries associated with tube kiting on June 26, 2006 in Wisconsin.

CPSC is also aware of 12 serious injuries associated with tube kiting. The injuries include a broken neck, punctured lung, broken ribs, broken femur, chest and back injuries, and facial injuries, such as jaw fractures. A 14-year-old girl who was tube kiting lost consciousness when it fell about 15 feet and struck the water.

Tube kites are very large, sometimes round, inflatable water devices that can be more than 10 feet in diameter. The tube is hooked to the back of a boat by a tow rope, and the tube rider pulls back on a rope as the boat travels at speeds between 25 and 35 miles per hour. The ride begins when the tube is lifted into the air trailing the boat. Possible reasons for incidents and injuries include: 1) rider�s difficulty in controlling the tube, 2) boat operator inexperience, and 3) how the tube reacts in certain weather conditions. The conditions of highest concern are wind gusts that can cause the tube to spin out of control, or sudden slowing or stopping by the boat operator, which can cause the tube to nose dive into the water. In some cases, the sudden stopping of the boat might cause the tube rider to continue past the boat and hit it or hit other boats or stationary objects, such as a bridge.

The National Park Service has banned the inflatable devices in at least one of its parks, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which includes Lake Powell where there have been at least four serious injuries.

bill church Says: July 10, 2006 at 5:25 am

Here are a few photos from my smack down on the Kite Tube Saturday. After flying the but 25-30 feet in the air, it inverted and whipped me into the water as we were going 40mph. Luckily, I curled into a ball and have a lot of extra padding in my butt. I was knocked unconscious and floating face down until I was pulled out of the water by the driver Jim Bennett. I am fine, some bruising, 2 broken ribs and a punctured lung. All will heal. I am sending the tube back. It certainly wasn’t stable when it was flying. Of all the sports I have tried (wake boarding, snow boarding, water skiing, barefooting, knee boarding, intertubing, snow skiing, kite boarding, wind sailing, parasailing and others), this was the most dangerous and is going to kill someone. Luckily, it wasn’t my time…

I started to research this and 2 people have died in the first 60 days since the product was released. There are many many injuries and some are much worse than mine. I am going to to try to get this off the market before more people die. here are a few and a video of someone flying off it…http://www.steadywinds.com/

Tyrone Says: July 11, 2006 at 6:50 am

I want to clarify that the “death trap” label should not be confined to the Kite Tube…it simply seems to apply to the concept.

The Manta Ray, by Sevylor, had similar problems – no known deaths (possibly because it doesn’t get as high off the water), but still the same issues, random crashes, uncontrollable, flips over upside down while in the air, and simply put, injures its riders.

The fact is, these are not parasails, and there is no control factor – they look fun, and can be, but any gust of wind at any given time, even if only pulling at 20-25 mph, can result in the unpredictable.

Logically, if you are suddenly 30-40 feet above the water, going 25 mph, and this thing flips over, and you fall, what do you think is going to happen?

Karen Says: July 11, 2006 at 11:40 am

I work in the marine industry and these have been a sell out since we first recieved them. We and several other wholesalers have discontinued selling this product. It has been outlawed in some states. I have heard of some very traumatic injuries resulting from the use of this water ‘toy’. I am certain that if used safely as intended there would be far fewer injuries, however, people take it to the edge, the extreme with unfortunate results.

Ernie Says: July 11, 2006 at 1:00 pm

Wish I had read these comments before Kite Tubing on Lake Roosevelt last weekend. Got lifted about 20-25 feet and flipped like a pancake while traveling at 38 miles per hour. Pretty comparible to getting punched in the back of the head by Lennox Lewis while being body slammed by the Undertaker. Didn’t get knocked out or do any lasting damage, but saw some serious stars. It all happened pretty fast. Prior to this, we were having a great time, but got a little more bold as the day went on. We weren’t quite getting high enough so we decided to go a little faster. The wind picked up slightly and it was all over from there. I started getting some serious air, and then the aforementioned occured. If my head had entered the water before my body, I wouldn’t be surprised if I was in a wheelchair right now. Probably never going to ride this thing again, and from what I have been reading it seems like its the beginning of the end for this contraption anyways. Stick with good old fashioned tubing because there is no level of skill that can help you out on the Flying Spatula, I mean Kite Tube.

bil Says: July 13, 2006 at 12:17 pm

Not just confined to kite tubes. There are some 100″ers out there that will do the same thing. Last year we had a little sub 100 lb kid out put the rope on the tower . . going about 25 into a stiff wind . . . the wind gusted and took the kid 30 plus feet in the air . . . the whip was violent . . . the kid was purple . . . blood coming out of his nose . . .almost unconscious . . . got to use good sense with all of them. . . . things behind the boat are pretty extreme any way . . . keep the rope low . . .

Nathan Says: July 13, 2006 at 5:18 pm

I was on Lake Cumberland a few days ago on the kite tube. We had a very experienced boat driver(30+ yrs of boating) that was going 20 MPH into the wind. I got lifted up 30-40 feet in about a second, flipped over and got thrusted into the water on my back. Couldn’t breathe and got picked up by ambulance. Bruised kidneys, chest and back bruising. I was very lucky that I didn’t land on my head or neck. I could have been killed.

Jeff Says: July 17, 2006 at 12:52 pm

Northeast Indiana-July 2nd we took out the kite tube which my friend brought up. Had some great runs and then in the “narrows” of the lake launched one friend about 15 ft and he came down hard and got the wind knocked out of him. The final run of the day was worse when in the same place another friend took off even higher than the last and landed on his back. We had to make a makeshift neck collar and he became pale in the face. His vision was blurry and complained of neck and lower back pain. Thankfully he was moving his lower body. An ambulance came and took him to the hospital. No severe damage. He chipped 5 teeth and one will have to be repaired. Only muscle strains but it could have been worse. Glad to have had 4 lifeguards and an athletic trainer in the boat. Everyone suffered pain from the tube. Heard the incident with my friend and others on ESPN radio today. Very dangerous…be aware!!

X Says: July 20, 2006 at 1:41 pm

I was out at Thompson Lake in Howell, Michigan last weekend and I was chillin at the sandbar with the gang and up comes this boat flying down the middle of the lake with this kid up flying up in the air 15 feet and then dropping to the water, then flying up and dropping. I think the main thing is you gotta control the drop. Don’t try to stay in the air the entire time. I didn’t see anything catastrophic happen and everyone on the shore wanted one by the end of the day. I’m not sure it needs to be outlawed because those guys looked like they were trained to do it. I wouldn’t mind having them still available to people that know the risk and want to take the gamble still. It’s definitly entertaining to watch and if you want to be a daredevil, then why not? I think the main problem is the speed that you travel at. If they could figure out a way to go airborn at a slower speed or improve the stability, then I would support that instead of just canning it alltogether. I thought they were really on to something. I think for alot of extreme sports, you gotto go out there and get hurt a few times but in this case, you have to take it real slow and be patient. There’s lakes shielded really well by trees and wind conditions. I think the open water like salt water oceans…where it’s less predictable is just dangerous. Know the risks, that’s where the company went wrong because nobody really knew what to expect and people have to be trained and prolly licensed. That will never happen. Oddly though, now that they have been recalled the value of getting one has skyrocketed. Can anyone explain that?

– X

X Says: July 20, 2006 at 2:00 pm

I got curious so I reviewed everyone’s comments. Everyone that uses one of these doesn’t get hurt.

Jerry – saltwater (open wind conditions)
– kept going after someone got hurt. 1 whipflash and another unconscious.

Sean – admited “really windy” conditions
– 3 guys got hurt

Bill Church – going 40+ miles an hour

Ernie – going 38 miles an hour

Nathan – “riding into the wind”…windy conditions

Anyone see a pattern here? I doubt the owner’s manual tells you go take it out into the wind and go 40 miles an hour…and oh by the way if someone get’s hurt, just drop them off at the dock and take the next guy out. It’s just my opinion but I would bet in almost every one of these cases that there were warning signs and that further injury could have possibly been avoided. Admitedly, this is a very dangerous sport but it’s even worse when people just ignore precaution. If you do get one of these, don’t be like any of these guys and go too fast or take it out in windy conditions. And if you have an injury that day, you may want to think about stopping or getting a better experienced driver.

– X

R. Russo Says: August 12, 2006 at 9:41 pm

Article Last Updated: 08/02/2006 07:23:47 PM MDT

TUBE KITES PROVIDE A BIG RUSH, BUT DANGERS ARE EXTREME
By Brett Prettyman
The Salt Lake Tribune

In the span of 76 days, the Wego Kite Tube by SportsStuff Inc. went from being honored as the best new sports product of the year by the Sporting Good Manufacturers Association to becoming a voluntary safety recall item.
New numbers show that as of July 27, 84 people have been injured in 77 incidents involving Wego Kite Tubes in the U.S., including two deaths, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). At least one death has been linked to the Wego Kite Tube in Canada.
The Wego is a 10-foot, round and inflatable tube designed to be towed behind power boats. Riders can lift the tube off the water when speeds of 20 to 40 mph are reached. The tube can rise as high 60 feet, according to some users.
Kite tubes provide a new form of adrenaline rush and the falls provide some amazing video footage for frat house fodder, but officials say the dangers are extreme.
“They are hard to control and can lift users as high as 40 feet into the air. The impact from falling from these sorts of heights at such a high rate of speed into the water would be similar to hitting concrete,” said Dave Harris, boating coordinator for Utah State Parks and Recreation.
Rangers at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area in southern Utah and northern Arizona first noticed various forms of tube kites – Kite Tube is trademarked by SportsStuff Inc. — on Lake Powell in April. Four serious injuries and multiple minor incidents forced National Park Service officials to ban tube kites at Glen Canyon in mid-June.
Utah State Parks and Recreation officials haven’t banned the aerial devices from the state’s public waters yet, but the agency is making sure people understand how dangerous they can be.
Harris said there have been at least two unreported cases of individuals requiring a trip to the hospital after falling from tube kites at state parks. He reminds boaters that any accident involving death, medical treatment beyond basic first aid or combined property damage greater than $2,000 is required by law to be reported.
State Parks personnel will begin hanging safety posters discouraging the use of tube kites and will issue a warning on the Web page, http://www.stateparks.utah.gov.
SportsStuff Inc. placed a voluntary recall on 19,000 Wego Kite Tubes in cooperation with the CPSC in July. Injuries range from broken necks, to punctured lungs to head trauma.
In addition to the Wego, Glen Canyon Recreation Area officials also banned all forms of tube kites including the Manta by Sevylor.
Julie Vallese, CPSC director of public affairs, can’t say whether Sevylor officials have been asked to recall the Manta, but did confirm that the agency’s tube kite investigation included all products in that category.
Contact Brett Prettyman at [email protected] or 801-257-8902. Send comments to [email protected].
See video online at http://www.sltrib.com/outdoors

Peter M Says: September 12, 2006 at 5:21 am

Hi, I have a wego for sale if anyone is looking to purchase out of curiosity,to use, (we did without injury) for court evidence, as a museum piece, as a thrill ride for your mother-in-law or nasty girlfriend….or just own a piece of nautical history which I am sure will rival a piece of the Titanic on the collectable list at some point in the future. I can be contacted at [email protected]
thanks….Peter

Trevor Says: April 4, 2007 at 9:02 am

Anyone interested in purchasing a kite tube, I am selling one. I have used it about 8 times. It is tons of fun and enjoying if used correctly by the rider and driver. The reason I am selling is not because of injuries or rumors, I just don’t use it enough for now nor will I in the near future. Please contact me if you wish to purchase. [email protected]

josh Says: July 3, 2007 at 8:34 am

if any one wantes to sell a kite tube call me 734 417 8899

Josh Says: August 7, 2007 at 1:53 am

Looking to buy a Sevylor Mante Ray. Any info E-mail me. Thanx

Kevin Says: October 4, 2007 at 5:37 am

Well I got to thank you all for your incredibly funny posts…..I have not laughed as much since “Jackass.. Stevo in the jungle”. If you could have seen me bent double in front of the puter screen tears rolling down my eyes….ahhhh!! I am still recovering thanks again all.
Kevin

ryan Says: March 9, 2008 at 7:02 pm

anyone have a kite tube they want to get rid of?

marc Says: March 7, 2009 at 9:45 pm

wanted: kite tube(wego) or flying mantra. I had one ordered years ago but was denied. 1 day late(recalled). Darn.

john Says: July 22, 2009 at 2:15 pm

this tube is amazing, i dont care about injurys i already broke 23 bones. i WANT IT, also ive rode it before and i got 200 ft of air, best time of my life.

billy Says: July 22, 2009 at 2:17 pm

i agree john i love flying and this is a good way to get air. i dont think that you could get hurt to bad.

billy Says: July 22, 2009 at 2:23 pm

i am paralyzed from the waist down and am looking for a way out. the mental institution of america is looking for me.. and since im about sychopath, this is how i want to die..

Ryan Says: August 9, 2009 at 5:29 pm

Looking for a Wego Kite tube to buy. Any one have one or know where I can buy a used one.

jeremy Says: April 24, 2011 at 6:46 pm

i have one for sale give me a call 205-365-6309 ill ship it. its been used maybe 3 times. rope included make offer just not responsible for nothing i would like a waiver signed saying it.
jeremy

Thushara Says: July 29, 2011 at 6:29 am

tell me what is the minimum boat engine hp needed to tube kiting

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